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August 30

Henry James

Henry James wrote novellas—a type of longer short story—in addition to novels. The Turn of the Screw is perhaps the best known.

Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

1904: You Can Go Home Again
Henry James returns to the U.S. after two decades abroad
Henry James followed the advice of every good writing teacher—just write what you know. So it makes sense that some of his novels, including Daisy Miller and The Portrait of a Lady, were based loosely on a life he himself had lived, as a young, naïve American interacting with sophisticated Europeans.

James, a native New Yorker born to wealthy parents, lived and traveled abroad for much of his life, coming back to the U.S. only occasionally. James used interior monologue and various points of view to observe relationships among people, sometimes across social classes, and often shaped by the social conventions of life in cities around the globe during the second half of the 19th century.
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