/arts-days/april/03

April 03

Marlon Brando and Man

Brando’s approach to acting revolutionized the art. The New York Times once reported, “there is before Brando, and there is after Brando. And they are like different worlds.”

Image © Bettman/CORBIS.

1924: The Godfather of Acting
Marlon Brando is born in Omaha, Nebraska
Though he never cared for the glitz and glitter of fame, few would question that Marlon Brando was perhaps the most accomplished actor of his day—or of any period since movie making began. While studying at the Actor’s Studio in New York City, Brando adopted the “method acting approach,” where he disappeared into the fictional characters he was asked to portray.

His unforgettable performances including Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire or Vito Corleone in The Godfather, stuck with viewers long after the movies ended because of Brando’s believable performances. A rebel by reputation, Brando was described by some directors and fellow actors as difficult to get along with while other colleagues said he was funny, generous, and professional. But his reputation didn’t stop him from racking up awards, including winning two Academy Awards® and being nominated for eight.
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