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April 14

Kinetoscope

While Thomas Edison conceived of the idea behind the kinetoscope, it was someone who worked for him—William Dickson—who did much of the nuts-and-bolts construction.

1896: The Very First Movie Projector
Thomas Edison patents the kinetoscope
The kinetoscope was a huge lumbering machine that paved the way for the movie projector that makes the Cineplex and video cameras possible for 21st century film buffs. Although Thomas Edison really didn’t have much hope that “moving pictures” would go far, he knew this machine could display a series of still shots—of say, a horse jumping over a fence—so quickly that it would give the illusion that the horse was leaping right before the viewer’s very eyes.

The viewer, by the way, was peeking into the machine through a hole at the top, so only one person at a time could see the show. Edison set up the kinetoscope in a little building he called the Kinetographic Theater and invited dancers, acrobats, and others to perform for him as his invention acted like a camera as well as a projector.
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