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February 28

Vaudeville Theatre

Working class audiences packed theaters to relax and enjoy entertainment on a regular basis. Performances were scheduled daily at multiple times to accommodate the crowds.
Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

1883: Make ’em Laugh, Make ’em Cry
The first vaudeville theater opens in Boston, Massachusetts
Vaudeville was a type of variety show with a bunch of back-to-back quick skits: A singing, tap-dancing man up first, then a dog riding a bike, then a few folks doing a comedy routine. And on and on for hours. If you could spin plates, sing well, or imitate various animal sounds, you, too, might have wanted to jump up on stage!

At its peak, thousands and thousands of performers worked the vaudeville circuit—a series of shows held at venues around North America. With everything from Yiddish theater to minstrel shows and contortionists to jugglers on the bill, vaudeville showcased the cultural diversity of 20th century America.

But vaudeville could not compete with the “moving picture show”—the form of entertainment we now call movies. Vaudeville shows went into a steep decline as movies became more popular.
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