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July 16

The Catcher in the Rye

The novel’s title is from an old folk song. Holden sees himself as the “catcher in the rye,” preventing innocent children who run through a rye field from falling off a cliff.

1951: Teenage Wasteland
J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye is published
Catcher in the Rye takes us into the mind of the self-destructive Holden Caulfield, the teenage protagonist and narrator of the book.

After being expelled from school, Holden’s misadventures in New York City and his profanity-laced comments about people around him, who he considers “phony,” contributed to the book being the most banned in the United States. Still to this day, however controversial the book is for some, it has become a standard text in most high school English classes. The book allows high school students to witness a fellow teen struggling with feelings of alienation from others his age as well as most of his family.

Salinger used the title as a metaphor for Holden’s attempt to protect a child’s innocence, though he is unable to preserve his own.
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