/arts-days/march/07

March 07

First photo taken with a camera

While its subject may not be easily identified, the survival of the first photo ever taken is very impressive.

The first photograph, taken by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce

1765: The Father of Fotos
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce is born in Chalon-Sur-Saone, France
Considering the impact that cameras and photography have had on the world, it’s a shame Joseph Nicéphore Niépce is not better known to us all. He’s considered one of the inventors of photography, and is said to have snapped the world’s very first photos, including one where a man is leading a horse.

Along the way, he dabbled with various chemicals, like silver chloride, which makes an image visible after it is exposed to light, and the process he invented called heliography. Around 1829, Niépce partnered with Louis Daguerre to try to achieve an improved photographic method; the men worked on the problem together until Niépce died in 1833.

When Daguerre went on to create the Daguerrotype—a kind of photograph printed on a mirror-like surface—the French government bought the rights to it, awarding money to both Daguerre and to the estate of Niépce, in recognition of the late inventor’s work.
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