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November 02

Johnny Campbell initiates a cheer

Today’s cheerleading is an extremely competitive sport at the high school and college levels, featuring tumbling, chanting, dancing, and jumping. That's not to say it's restricted to teens and adults. Many cheerleaders start very young training in gymnastics and youth cheer leagues.

Library of Congress, LC-USW3-039095-E

1898: Gimme a U! Gimme an M!
Johnny Campbell initiates cheerleading at the University of Minnesota
Back in 1898, a student at the University of Minnesota named Johnny Campbell led a crowd in a fervent chant meant to fire up their football team, the Gophers. This then, believe it or not, was the birth of organized cheerleading, which has evolved significantly over the years to become a sort of combination of sports and art that includes complex dance routines and physcial stunts.

It's technically considered a sport, and is heavily dominated by female participants. But back in Campbell’s day, the first “yell leader” squad was comprised of six young men, who encouraged the crowd to support the athletes on the field. For decades, in fact, cheerleaders were almost always male. And guess what? The cheer Campbell made up that day—“Rah, Rah, Rah! Sku-u-mar, Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! Varsity! Varsity! Varsity, Minn-e-so-tah!”—is still a favorite used today by the Gophers’ cheerleaders.
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