/educators/how-to/arts-integration/changing-education-through-the-arts/evaluation-studies

Changing Education Through The Arts (CETA)

Evaluation Studies

Changing Education Through the Arts (CETA) program

Presentation

Three independent evaluation studies have documented the impact of the Kennedy Center’s CETA program.

Two of the studies (2005-2008 and 1999-2004) focus exclusively on the CETA program. A third study (2004-2007) is a broader study of the impact of arts integration professional development in the Arts Integration Model Schools (AIMS) program in Montgomery County Public Schools (MD) in which the CETA program has played a prominent role.

2012-2013 Research

During the 2012-13 school year, a longitudinal study was conducted to examine the impact of the CETA program on 4th and 5th grade students, their parents, and teachers in 32 schools over five school districts in the D.C. metropolitan area. Comparisons were made between CETA students and matched control students in randomly selected classrooms with 796 students, parents, and 90 teachers sampled over three time points in one academic school year. Two areas of impact were examined: creativity and student engagement.

Individual Studies

2005 - 2008 Study

For a more detailed evaluation summary (9 pp.), click here.

To request a copy of the full report (273 pp.), click here.

The following is excerpted from the evaluation report, Changing Education Through the Arts (CETA) Program Evaluation by George Mason University (GMU)1

Introduction

The evaluation examines ways in which teachers’ understanding and implementation of arts integration techniques influence their pedagogical growth as a result of participating in the CETA program. Teachers’ perceptions of the ways that CETA has influenced school culture are analyzed. The evaluation also looks at students as beneficiaries of their teachers’ CETA professional development. Evaluators observed ways in which students were engaged in arts-integrated learning. Student understanding of both the arts and the non-arts content is analyzed.

Summary of Findings

Data across all sources during this three-year evaluation period suggest findings in four areas:

  • First, there was evidence of change in teachers’ and administrators’ attitudes, knowledge, and skills as they relate to recruitment of teachers for the CETA program and how teachers applied and used arts-integration pedagogy.
  • Second, data indicated that changes in teachers’ and administrators’ attitudes, knowledge, and skills have affected student work through increased use of arts-integrated pedagogy that has enabled students to demonstrate and express knowledge and understanding in multiple ways; an ability to reach more students from underrepresented populations; and positive students’ dispositions toward learning.
  • Third, across all data sources, collaboration, the school environment, and increased attention to parent education were among the major changes in school culture.
  • And finally, all sources of evidence support the structure of CETA as being integral to its effectiveness in the schools.

 

2004 - 2007 Study

For a more detailed evaluation summary (8 pp.), click here.

To request a copy of the full report (75 pp.), click here.

This independent evaluation by RealVisions1 examined The Arts Integration Model Schools Program (AIMS), a comprehensive arts integration professional development program in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) Maryland. The study, supported by a three-year Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination Grant (AEMDD) from the U.S. Department of Education, focused on the impact of professional development at three model schools.

The three model schools were part of the Kennedy Center’s Changing Education through the Arts (CETA) program and teachers participated in professional development offered by the CETA program as well as other arts organizations. Thus, the report is a broader study of the impact of arts integration professional development, in which the CETA program played a prominent, but not exclusive, role.

Main Conclusions2

The Arts Integration Model Schools program has:

  • Become an effective agent of change at all levels: classroom, school, system, and state.
  • Offered opportunities and possibilities for improving teacher practice and changing how teachers see themselves.
  • Increased student engagement in collaborative learning.
  • Been a catalyst for whole school change, spurred interest in arts integration at other schools within Montgomery County Public Schools
  • Created a pathway for training and credentialing Maryland teachers in using arts integration as a strategy for helping students learn in and through the arts.

Professional Development. The most critical component in improving teacher practice was professional development in arts integration. It provided teachers with arts integration skills and knowledge, a common language for arts integration, opportunities for collaboration with colleagues in school and during professional development, and played a significant role in the emergence of an effective cadre of teacher leaders within a strong community of learners.

Impact on Attitudes and Student Learning. Arts integration teachers found that their students became more motivated to learn, developed a more positive attitude toward learning, became more self-confident in their ability to learn, sustained more focus during the learning process, and cooperated with other students in ways that effectively promoted learning. …In changing students’ level of engagement in learning experiences, arts integration changed students’ attitudes toward learning and the arts. With these changed attitudes came improved student achievement.

The report includes additional conclusions related to teacher leaders, time required to build a critical mass of teachers, support structures, teacher collaboration, and student test scores.

 

1999 - 2004 Study

For a more detailed evaluation summary (5 pp.), click here.

To request a copy of the full report (52 pp.), click here.

The following is excerpted from the evaluation report, The Kennedy Center and Schools: Changing Education Through the Arts - Report on Implementation and Achievement: Fairfax County 1999-2004 by Dr. Ann Cale Kruger1.

Introduction

In 1999 the Kennedy Center launched an ambitious program to provide education and ongoing support for teachers to integrate the arts into elementary and middle school curricula. The Changing Education through the Arts (CETA) program includes school year courses and week-long intensive summer institutes, monthly in-school study group meetings, and support by in-school arts coaches. This multi-dimensional, long-term approach to professional development holds the promise of making real changes in teaching and learning.

Findings

Compared to Control teachers, CETA teachers reported a marginally significant increase in their overall implementation of the desired teaching practices over a three-year span. The average rate of implementation at the last point of data collection was between 1-2 times a term and 1-2 times a month. Students’ 5th grade SOL scores were similar in the CETA and Control groups and stable over time. Compared to Control students, CETA students showed significant improvement over a four-year span in academic achievement grades, academic effort grades, health/physical education achievement grades, and health/physical education effort grades. CETA students’ 3rd grade SOL scores in English and history improved significantly over time compared to Controls.

Limitations of the dataset (especially small sample size and incomplete datasets) and the design (quasi-experimental) necessarily constrain the interpretation of these findings as strictly causal in nature. However, the findings strongly suggest that the CETA program leads teachers to significantly increase their implementation strategies over time and that student achievement increases in a comparable fashion.

It is strongly recommended that the CETA staff continue to cooperate with Fairfax County to update this dataset annually. It is also recommended that CETA consider adding a second data source for measuring teacher implementation and begin to collect data on academic achievement that is not measured by a standardized test. These additions to the data collection process currently underway will add statistical and interpretive power to future evaluations.

Credits

Editors & Producers

Amy Duma
Director, Teacher and School Programs
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Lynne B. Silverstein
Senior Program Consultant
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Kenny Neal
Producer

Sources

2005-2008 Study

  1. “Changing Education Through the Arts: Final Evaluation Report, 2005-2008” Prepared by Joan Isenberg, Professor and Associate Dean, and Jennifer McCreadie, Director, Assessment and Program Evaluation, with Jennifer Durham and Bernadine Pearson, Graduate Research Assistants, George Mason University, College of Education and Human Development, Fairfax, VA. April 13, 2009.
2004-2007 Study

  1. Final Evaluation Report, June 2007, Montgomery County Public Schools MD, Arts Integration Model Schools Program, 2004-2007 prepared by RealVisions Consultants: Linda Whitesitt, Elda Franklin, Bennett Lentczner with Nancy Wolcott, editor. June 29, 2007.
  2. Ibid., 27-30.
1999-2004 Study

  1. The Kennedy Center and Schools: Changing Education Through the Arts - Report on Implementation and Achievement: Fairfax County 1999-2004 by Dr. Ann Cale Kruger, Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, College of Education, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. January 2005.

© 1996-2017 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts  

ArtsEdge is an education program of

The Kennedy Center 

with the support of

Department of Education



ARTSEDGE, part of the Rubenstein Arts Access Program, is generously funded by David and Alice Rubenstein.

Additional support is provided by the U.S. Department of Education.

Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee
for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

The contents of this Web site were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However, those contents do not
necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal government.
Unless otherwise stated, ArtsEdge materials may be copied, modified and otherwise utilized for non-commercial educational purposes
provided that ArtsEdge and any authors listed in the materials are credited and provided that you permit others to use them in the same manner.

Change Background:

Connect with us!    EMAIL US | YouTube | Facebook | iTunes | MORE!

© 1996-2017 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts  
    Privacy Policy
| Terms and Conditions

Close

You are now leaving the ArtsEdge website. Thank you for visiting!

If you are not automatically transferred, please click the link below:
http://absoluteshakespeare.com

ArtsEdge and The Kennedy Center are in no way responsible for the content of the destination site, its ongoing availability, links to other site or the legality or accuracy of information on the site or its resources.

Cancel

Close