/tag-search

Tag Results for "Visual Arts" See All Tags

151-212 of 212 Results:  
arts quote

Arts Quotes: Pablo Picasso
"Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Pablo Picasso
"Nature does many things the way I do, but she hides them!"
Europe, Visual Arts, Nature

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Pablo Picasso
"For a long time I limited myself to one color... as a form of discipline."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: James Rosenquist
"I was probably born with the ability to draw, but that does not make you an artist."
America, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Joshua Reynolds
"A room hung with pictures is a room hung with thoughts."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: John Ruskin
"When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Hans Hofmann
"A work of art is a world in itself, reflecting senses and emotions of the artist’s world."
Europe, Education, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Constantin Brancusi
"Architecture is inhabited sculpture."
Visual Arts, Architecture, Europe

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Cézanne
"Don’t be an art critic, but paint, there lies salvation."
Visual Arts, Controversial

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Cézanne
"Painting from nature is not copying the object; it is realizing one's sensations."
Nature, Visual Arts, Europe

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Jean Arp
"Art is a fruit that grows in man, like a fruit on a plant, or a child in its mother’s womb."
Visual Arts, Europe

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Scott Adams
"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep."
Visual Arts, Cartoons, Comics, & Animation

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Roy Adzak
"Good art is not what it looks like, but what it does to us."
Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Anonymous
"Art is the imagination expressed through the senses."
Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Vincent Van Gogh
"Color in a picture is like enthusiasm in life."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Vincent Van Gogh
"The only time I feel alive is when I’m painting."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Andy Goldsworthy
"The essence of drawing is the line exploring space."
Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Gardner
"A painting is never finished - it simply stops in interesting places."
Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Gauguin
"Art is either plagiarism or revolution."
Europe, Visual Arts, Controversial

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Gauguin
"The flat sound of my wooden clogs on the cobblestones, deep, hollow and powerful, is the note I seek in my painting."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Gauguin
"I shut my eyes in order to see."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Hans Hofmann
"The whole world, as we experience it visually, comes to us through the mystic realm of color."
Europe, Education, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: David Hockney
"Style is something you can use, and you can be like a magpie, just taking what you want."
Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Leonardo Da Vinci
"The color of the object illuminated partakes of the color of that which illuminates it. "
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Jacques-Louis David
"To give body and perfect form to your thought, this alone is what it is to be an artist."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Salvador Dali
"Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Edgar Degas
"Only when he no longer knows what he is doing does the painter do good things."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Edgar Degas
"Art is not what you see, but what you make others see."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Salvador Dali
"You have to systematically create confusion, it sets creativity free."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Salvador Dali
"When I paint, the sea roars. The others splash about in the bath."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Salvador Dali
"People love mystery, and that is why they love my paintings."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Salvador Dali
"Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce nothing."
Europe, Visual Arts

The Guggenheim

Arts Days: October 21, 1959: The Wright Man for the Job
When Solomon Guggenheim’s personal advisor approached architect Frank Lloyd Wright to design a building to house Guggenheim’s art collection, he told Wright, “I need a fighter, a lover of space, an originator, a tester, and a wise man.” Wright was indeed the right man. It took 16 years to complete, but the result is one of New York’s signature buildings, an edifice as iconoclastic as the art it contains.

Wright rejected buildings’ traditional cubical shape; instead, he chose to mimic smooth, round forms of nature. The interior is no less revolutionary. Visitors ride elevators to the top floor, and from there descend a sloping ramp that lets viewers experience the artwork as one continuous series.
Architecture, Visual Arts, Innovators & Pioneers, Art Venues

Painting by Johannes Vermeer

Arts Days: October 31, 1632: Johannes Vermeer
Thank goodness for recordkeeping. Much of what we know of the Dutch master Johannes Vermeer stems from official documents used to note births, deaths, marriages, and other life milestones. Artistically speaking, however, we learn much about the times in which Vermeer lived by examining his paintings.

Renowned for interior scenes of 17th century life in Holland, Vermeer’s principal subjects were usually women engaged in ordinary activities like pouring milk, reading a letter, or sewing. Captured through soft light, generally provided by an open, left window, Vermeer’s hallmarks were simple forms, muted colors, and restrained brushwork. Vermeer’s work is viewed today as one of the high points of the Golden Age of Dutch Painting.
Europe, Visual Arts

Lichtenstein Exhibit

Arts Days: October 27, 1923: Pop Goes the Easel
Roy Lichtenstein challenged many conventions about what constituted art. As a pop artist painting, stenciling, and drawing images inspired by advertisements and comics, then reproducing them closely but not exactly, he found worldwide fame as well as notoriety. Some critics claimed he was merely copying the work of others.

But Lichtenstein believed that his intent—to comment on how the mass media treated the same subjects he painted—separated him from the artists who created the original images. Lichtenstein was among those who experimented with Ben-Day, a printing process that combines two or more different small, colored dots to create a third color.
Cartoons, Comics, & Animation, Innovators & Pioneers, Visual Arts, America

peanuts comic

Arts Days: October 02, 1950: Nuts About Peanuts
Charles M. Schultz was the first cartoonist to use his pen to delve into the insecurities and uncertainties of modern life.

Schultz’s questioning of the human condition might not have been so welcome had he not filtered it through his young illustrated characters, who deeply resonated with readers: Charlie Brown, the “every-man” figure, the hapless hero, determined not to give up; Snoopy, the adorable dog-dreamer, who sees things the way they should be, not as they are; plus pals Linus and Schroeder, sister Sally, and, of course, Lucy, the domineering realist, always quick to put Charlie Brown in his place.

“Peanuts” was an enormous success and remains a favorite today; its offshoots include multiple iconic television specials, plays, and ice shows.
Cartoons, Comics, & Animation, America, Visual Arts, Popular Culture

Crayola Crayons

Arts Days: September 30, 1902: Color My World
Edwin Binney and C. Harold Smith were a couple of enterprising cousins who took over Binney’s dad’s company, Peekskill Chemical Works, back in 1885. While Peekskill initially made charcoal and other products, the cousins expanded the product line to include black crayons at first, and eventually a whole rainbow’s worth.

Introduced in 1903, the first box of crayons cost a nickel and included red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, brown, and of course, black. It was Binney’s wife who coined the name: “craie” the French word for stick of color, plus “ola,” from oleaginous, a term describing the consistency of the petroleum used in the crayons. Today, the company once known as Binney & Smith is officially Crayola, LLC.
Inventions, Innovators & Pioneers, Visual Arts, Popular Culture

Cave Painting of a Horse

Arts Days: September 12, 1940: The Writing on the Wall
Estimated to be about 16,000 years old, the paintings in a network of caves found by four teenage boys are rare examples of art from the Upper Paleolithic era. Here in a region called Lascaux, hundreds of painted animals are visible on the caves’ walls, ranging from bison to stags to horses.

There are also geometric figures and patterns of dots that some say correlate with constellations. Some of the paintings show a sophisticated grasp of concepts like perspective and depth, too. Art historians say that the paintings indicate some of our oldest ancestors’ ability to express themselves in art.
Folklore, Geography, History, Europe, Visual Arts, World Cultures

A model wearing a mink trimmed peignoir designed by Elsa Schiaparelli.

Arts Days: September 10, 1890: Shocking Fashionista
Elsa Schiaparelli designed the kind of couture clothes you see on the pages of Vogue and on the backs of celebrities. Known for her sometimes startling, often witty designs, including a shoe-shaped hat, she also created garments that responded to news events. For example, after France declared war on Germany in 1939, she debuted taffeta skirts printed with a camouflage look.

Schiaparelli was the first designer to use shoulder pads and to prominently feature hot pink, a color she called “shocking pink.” Collaborating with important artists of the day, such as Salvador Dali, she created a fancy evening gown decorated with Dali’s drawing of an enormous red lobster. This renegade clothier helped elevate fashion to high art.
Innovators & Pioneers, Fashion, Controversial, Visual Arts

Daguerrotype

Arts Days: August 19, 1839: The 19th Century Polaroid
In the early 19th century, Louis-Jacques Daguerre partnered with Joseph Nicéphore Niépce to take the photographic method to the next level. After Niépce died, Daguerre developed a means of printing an image on a mirror-like surface using an improbable list of ingredients: salt water, mercury, iodine, and more. The resulting image produced on the daguerreotype was reversed, as though seen in a mirror.

Because of the way the process worked, people sitting to have their faces captured on daguerreotype had to sit absolutely still. And the image also had to be stored in an airtight box to protect it—oxygen or fingerprints would ruin the daguerreotype. Still, this method of making early photos caught on around the world, until the less complex tintype process succeeded it.
Visual Arts, Inventions, Innovators & Pioneers

Andy Warhol

Arts Days: August 06, 1928: Prince of Pop Art
Whether silkscreening, painting, filming, or photographing his subjects, artist Andy Warhol looked at them with a brand-new eye. Though he began his career designing ads and record covers, it’s as a fine artist that his creativity took flight.

Warhol used images of familiar objects—from Campbell’s Soup cans to Brillo dishwashing sponges—to find the artistic qualities in mundane objects and to redefine what constituted art. His work supports “pop art”—a 20th century art movement in which popular culture’s logos, products, and images are used together or separately—and, its creators say, is elevated to something on par with more traditional art.

At the end of the day, Warhol created uniquely American art that commented on our obsession with celebrities and consumerism.
America, Popular Culture, Visual Arts

Harmony in Red (La chambre rouge; La Desserte - Harmonie rouge), 1908-1909

Arts Days: December 31, 1869: Master of Color
The great French artist Henri Matisse moved fluidly through five decades of art, exploring several different media along the way, from sketching to a form of collage known as “cut outs.” He was one of the key members of the Fauve movement, whose adherents used unusually bold color combinations to create stylized paintings that pushed back against realism.

Yet later in his career, Matisse hewed more toward traditional types of painting, even as his use of color continued to electrify viewers. In his seventies, he also leapt wholeheartedly into collage, using scissors to cut shapes from paper when holding a brush became too difficult for him. Perhaps the greatest French artist of the 20th century, Henri Matisse made art until the very end.
Visual Arts, Europe

Wax Figures by Marie Tussaud

Arts Days: December 01, 1761: Waxy Lady
Anna Maria Grosholtz—better known as Madame Tussaud—was taught to make life size wax figures by the doctor for whom her mom worked. While the art of creating often eerily lifelike wax versions of people had been around since the Middle Ages, it was Tussaud and her traveling show of wax figures that made viewing such figures a form of “edutainment”—partly a way to learn about famous people of the past and present, partly just plain fun.

While Madame Tussauds’ London museum kicked off the phenomenon—today everybody from Benjamin Franklin to Jennifer Lopez to President Obama is on view at outposts in Shanghai, New York, Amsterdam, and its newest addition, Washington, D.C.
Popular Culture, Visual Arts, Europe

Haystacks Summer Evening

Arts Days: November 14, 1840: A Light Impression
Many artists wear the Impressionist label today, but it was a painting by Claude Monet that gave this art movement its name. That moment happened when an art critic looked at Monet’s Impression, Sunrise and called it “impressionist.” Ironically, while the critic meant his remark as dismissive of Monet’s style, the term became associated with a much-loved and respected school of century art.

Many works by Monet are characterized by the hallmarks of Impressionism: soft and changeable light effects, visible brushstrokes that reveal the artist’s emotions and personality, and the use of everyday things and people as subjects—from haystacks to playful children. Monet loved the natural world, and simple things such as flowers, the river Seine, and his personal garden in Giverny, France, inspired him.
Innovators & Pioneers, Europe, Nature, Visual Arts

Georgia O'Keefe

Arts Days: November 15, 1887: Portrait of an Artist
Simple, intimate, precise: These are just some of the words that characterize the painting style of Georgia O’Keeffe, who was inspired to paint flowers, deserts, bones, and other objects according to this aesthetic. She painted in New York City and New York’s Adirondack Mountains, and in the Southwest, near her longtime home in New Mexico.

O’Keeffe sometimes painted in a very abstract way; other times, in a literal fashion. She could render a skyscraper in blocks of color or paint a flower in rich, lush detail. O’Keeffe is considered to have been one of the key artists—male or female—whose work inspired and impressed European art and artists. And as a woman working in a field then dominated by men, makes her influence even more impressive.
Innovators & Pioneers, Visual Arts, America

The Dance Class painting by Edgar Degas

Arts Days: July 19, 1834: Dancing with Degas
Edgar Degas, one of the most productive 19th century artists and a master at charcoal, oil paint, and pastels, is considered one of the fathers of the Impressionist movement. Thing is, Degas himself disliked this term, preferring to call himself a realist when it came to the subjects he chose and the art he made.

He is best known for his paintings and sculptures of ballerinas, such as The Dance Class. Degas gave us glimpses of dancers waiting in the wings for their cues to go on stage, as well as audiences studying their moves. Mostly, he took his subjects from everyday life, catching a passing moment of motion and emotion.
Europe, Visual Arts

Rembrandt

Arts Days: July 15, 1606: Dutch Master
Dutch painter Rembrandt Van Rijn created beautiful paintings, including many naturalistic self-portraits. Even during his twenties, Rembrandt’s skills as a portrait painter were in great demand for his delicate attention to light and shadows, which he used to shape his subjects’ features.

He gained attention for works like the slightly gruesome The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, in which a doctor uses a corpse to show his students how human arm muscles work. Rembrandt sought to paint the most realistic-looking people and places he possibly could, whether they were richly hued paintings of everyday life in Holland or intricate etches of Biblical images.
Europe, Visual Arts

Vincent Van Gogh

Arts Days: March 30, 1853: A Stroke of Genius
The work of Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh is almost instantly recognizable with those big swirly brush strokes and short choppy ones, day-to-day subjects like haystacks and sunsets, and something harder to put your finger on: a pulsating kind of energy that almost makes the objects and figures seem to vibrate.

Van Gogh’s kinetic, passionate art was driven, sadly, by a lifetime of misfortune. He struggled with poverty, health problems, and depression; in fact, he’s well known for cutting off a piece of his own ear and giving it to a woman he knew, wrapped in newspaper.

One of the few constants in his life was his brother Theo, who helped him manage what money he did earn for his work and tried to support him emotionally as well. In works like Sunflowers and Starry Night, the creativity of the troubled genius Van Gogh touches us even today.
Europe, Visual Arts

The Sistene Chapel

Arts Days: March 06, 1475: Master of Arts
Nothing but making art was important to Michelangelo Buonarroti. As a young apprentice or someone who learns a skill from an expert, Michelangelo found his calling. He chose to study the art of the old masters and learn the technique of painting frescoes, or painting on wet plaster.

When the powerful Medici family of Florence heard the stories about this young genius, Lorenzo de’Medici supported the artist and his work. In the period we now call the Italian Renaissance, (15th–16th centuries), Michelangelo created many of the world’s greatest art masterpieces: sculptures including David and The Pietà, the architectural designs of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, and perhaps his most cherished achievement, the paintings on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

This pictorial story about the creation of man is comprised of nine paintings and took Michelangelo three years to paint. It is believed to be the greatest work of art ever created by a single person.
Europe, Visual Arts

First photo taken with a camera

Arts Days: March 07, 1765: The Father of Fotos
Considering the impact that cameras and photography have had on the world, it’s a shame Joseph Nicéphore Niépce is not better known to us all. He’s considered one of the inventors of photography, and is said to have snapped the world’s very first photos, including one where a man is leading a horse.

Along the way, he dabbled with various chemicals, like silver chloride, which makes an image visible after it is exposed to light, and the process he invented called heliography. Around 1829, Niépce partnered with Louis Daguerre to try to achieve an improved photographic method; the men worked on the problem together until Niépce died in 1833.

When Daguerre went on to create the Daguerrotype—a kind of photograph printed on a mirror-like surface—the French government bought the rights to it, awarding money to both Daguerre and to the estate of Niépce, in recognition of the late inventor’s work.
Europe, Innovators & Pioneers, Inventions, Visual Arts

Polaroid

Arts Days: February 21, 1947: Say “Cheese!”
Even in the age of the digital camera, there’s still something really cool about shooting a picture with a Polaroid camera and having that snapshot pop into your hand and develop right before your eyes.

But before he invented that instant camera, American inventor Edwin Land worked on polarizing filters for sunglasses, special goggles for troops in combat during World War II, and other products for the company he founded in 1937 called the Polaroid Corporation. After Land showed his instant camera for the first time, his company got busy selling them to department stores. The cameras proved so easy and fun to use—and so affordable—the stores could not keep them from flying off the shelves.
Inventions, Popular Culture, Visual Arts

Louis Comfort Tiffany

Arts Days: February 18, 1848: A Glass Act
Glass is all around us, in everyday common objects like windows, picture frames, and windshields. But Louis Comfort Tiffany saw glass as an artistic medium like no other, with the potential for showcasing deep colors that would be made even more dazzling when the sun shone through the panes.

In his work alone or with his colleagues, Tiffany explored the effects of opalescent glass, which included different hues of the same color, as well as textured glass—glass with ripples, bumps, or other “imperfections” that Tiffany believed to be actual enhancements. He also placed layers of glass atop one another for a richer tone. Using these methods, he created lamps, jewelry, vases, and bowls as well as glass windows.
Visual Arts, Fashion, Innovators & Pioneers

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Arts Days: February 25, 1841: A Lasting Impression
Renoir was an artist fascinated by light: how the sun looked shining on water, how a candle’s flickering changed the expression of someone sitting nearby, how shadows stretched long across the ground in the autumn.

Exploring these concepts, Renoir became one of the early members along with Claude Monet and Alfred Sisley of the Impressionist school, a style of 19th century art known for its exploration of light effects, broad brushstrokes, and ordinary subjects including people on the beach, flower gardens, and other scenes of everyday life.

Later in his career Renoir sought to achieve a more crisp style of painting. It’s thought this change was influenced by a trip he took to Italy in 1881 to study the great works of the Italian Renaissance, painted by artists like Raphael.
Europe, Visual Arts

Kodachrome

Arts Days: June 22, 2009: Photo Finish
Kodachrome was the favored film of many a photographer over the course of its 74-year history, but it simply could not compete with the rise of today’s digital media and development. When the company pulled the plug on Kodachrome, it accounted for only one percent of sales of all the film Kodak sold. Until then, it had been famous for the richness of color it imparted to photos and for the ability of images to retain their deep hues, even decades after they had been taken.

However, using the film meant you had to engage in a special, complex development process, or hire someone to do it for you, which made using Kodachrome more expensive for the photographer than other types of film. Still, many thought the extra cost was worth it.
Visual Arts, Inventions, History

Frank Lloyd Wright

Arts Days: June 08, 1867: The Wright Stuff
In the houses, churches, and museums he designed over his career, architect Frank Lloyd Wright sought more fervently than any architect before him to marry building design with environment—specifically, its land, trees, and bodies of water. Through his “organic architecture,” Wright created harmony between building materials and a structure’s natural surroundings. For example, when hired to design a home in the Southwest, he used rock in the design and let the desert vistas inspire the property’s lines.

A fine example of Wright’s “Prairie School” style with its low, horizontal lines is Westcott House in Ohio. And Fallingwater, in Pennsylvania, seems to spring forth from the rocks on which it’s built—the very same rocks where a waterfall runs. And Wright’s most iconic building, the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, with its curved, rounded lines, stands in stark contrast with the hard-edged skyscrapers that surround it.
Architecture, Innovators & Pioneers, Visual Arts

Richard Avedon

Arts Days: May 15, 1923: Capturing Souls with a Click
The creative eye of Richard Avedon shaped high fashion and documentary photography as few other professional photographers have.

Throughout his 50-year career, Avedon’s long affiliations with Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue magazines meant fashion photography would never be the same. He specialized in portraits of celebrities from the arts and public service to strangers on the street—each one intimate, revealing a moment captured in time. Many of these portraits feature subjects looking squarely at the camera with a plain background, resulting in shots filled with quiet, simple dignity. Interestingly, Avedon applied artistic principles of composition and juxtaposition to his pictures much as a painter would have.

Avedon was also present at key historical moments in the U.S. and abroad. He documented events during both the civil rights movement and anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s, and took many shots of the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Fashion, Innovators & Pioneers, Visual Arts

Salvador Dali

Arts Days: May 11, 1904: The Eccentric Dreamer
The school of artwork we call Surrealism took a radical leap forward when Salvador Dali teamed up with fellow Surrealists in the late 1920s. The Surrealists were rebelling against what they saw as predictable, traditional art, and Dali—who had already been kicked out of art school and was famous for his eccentric behavior and attire—fit right in.

His artworks—including The Persistence of Memory, with its clocks draped over trees, ledges, and what appears to be a piece of bone with a face not unlike Dali’s own— are filled with quirky images, startling contrasts, and symbolism (meaning that one object stood for something else—an idea, a memory, a concept). But some of his images are surprisingly sentimental: People he loved, like Lucia, a woman who took care of him when he was a child, appear frequently in his art.
Europe, Visual Arts, Innovators & Pioneers

Joan Miró

Arts Days: April 20, 1893: Señor of Surreal
The playful works of the Spanish painter and sculptor Joan Miró are admired and appreciated around the world today, but when he first created them, they shocked viewers. No one had ever seen serious paintings filled with colorful, cartoon-like blobs, some of which looked like animals or eyes or socks floating across the canvas.

Miró, who early in his career painted landscapes and still-lifes of recognizable objects, didn’t care about what people thought about his style of painting. What he cared about was rejecting what he saw as people’s narrow assumptions of what art was…and was not. He was part of a group of artists called the Surrealists, working in the 1920s that was creating art filled with startling, funny, or just plain odd images.
Europe, Visual Arts, Innovators & Pioneers

Raphael

Arts Days: April 06, 1483: Renaissance Man
Raffaello Sanzio is considered one of the finest painters of the Italian Renaissance, which flourished in the 15th and 16th centuries. And so, Raphael needs only one name. His paintings, including The Madonna of the Meadow and The School of Athens (one of the series of paintings in the Vatican’s Stanze di Rafaello, or “Raphael’s rooms”) are filled with trademarks of his signature techniques, from their rich, luminous colors to the graceful placement of his human figures.

Important apprenticeships, combined with his own abundant talent, set the stage for Raphael’s thriving career painting commissioned pieces for churches and royal palaces. There’s also no question he paid attention to what Leonardo da Vinci was doing. But in the end, Raphael’s style—its nod to classic Greek art, the soft light that pervades many of the images—came to be all his own.
Europe, Visual Arts

Leonardo Da Vinci

Arts Days: April 15, 1452: The Da Vinci Mode
Though some assume his last name was “da Vinci,” no one really knows the last name of perhaps the greatest all-around creative genius who ever lived. The left-handed Leonardo was so very good at so many things: painting (the portrait of Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, and The Adoration of the Magi ), solving math problems, playing music, and technological inventiveness—he envisioned an early helicopter and other flying machines.

He learned about these subjects while apprenticing with various artists, doctors, and others, but his own curiosity helped him apply all he learned in entirely new ways. His interests fed off of one another. For example, his human anatomy sketches are stunning in their detail and accuracy, and that understanding of how bodies moved helped him to be a better painter. Leonardo also brought his deep understanding of geometry to his art, arranging figures in ways thought to be pleasing to the eye of the spectator. His contributions to art and science are impossible to measure.
Europe, Inventions, Innovators & Pioneers, Visual Arts

Vigeland

Arts Days: April 11, 1869: A Park of One’s Own
Sculptor Gustav Vigeland learned to carve wood when he was just a child, a skill that would serve him well as he moved on to working with different substances, like stone. At the end of the 19th century, he toured Italy and France where he visited the workshop of another great sculptor, Auguste Rodin.

Perhaps his greatest work is Vigeland Park, which came about when he persuaded the city of Oslo to give him a building in which to live and work. In exchange, he would give Oslo all of his subsequent creations. Today, on 80 acres of land, you can visit Vigeland Park, where hundreds of granite and bronze artworks stand, from whimsical statues of dancing babies to the Monolith, a 46-foot high totem depicting dozens of intertwined bodies rising up into the sky.
Europe, Visual Arts

ARTSEDGE logo

Educators: Educators Portal
Standards-based instructional resources, how-to's, guides and other supports for teaching with the arts
Education, Dance, Music, Theater, Visual Arts

‹  prev | 1 | 2 | 3
show: 25 | 50 | 75 | show all

Filter Your Results

Arts Subject

Select All | Deselect All

Grade Band

Select All | Deselect All

© 1996-2017 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts  

ArtsEdge is an education program of

The Kennedy Center 

with the support of

Department of Education



ARTSEDGE, part of the Rubenstein Arts Access Program, is generously funded by David and Alice Rubenstein.

Additional support is provided by the U.S. Department of Education.

Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee
for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

The contents of this Web site were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However, those contents do not
necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal government.
Unless otherwise stated, ArtsEdge materials may be copied, modified and otherwise utilized for non-commercial educational purposes
provided that ArtsEdge and any authors listed in the materials are credited and provided that you permit others to use them in the same manner.

Change Background:

Connect with us!    EMAIL US | YouTube | Facebook | iTunes | MORE!

© 1996-2017 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts  
    Privacy Policy
| Terms and Conditions

Close

You are now leaving the ArtsEdge website. Thank you for visiting!

If you are not automatically transferred, please click the link below:
http://absoluteshakespeare.com

ArtsEdge and The Kennedy Center are in no way responsible for the content of the destination site, its ongoing availability, links to other site or the legality or accuracy of information on the site or its resources.

Cancel

Close