/tag-search

Tag Results for "Europe" See All Tags

1-25 of 174 Results:  
Painting by Johannes Vermeer

Arts Days: October 31, 1632: Johannes Vermeer
Thank goodness for recordkeeping. Much of what we know of the Dutch master Johannes Vermeer stems from official documents used to note births, deaths, marriages, and other life milestones. Artistically speaking, however, we learn much about the times in which Vermeer lived by examining his paintings.

Renowned for interior scenes of 17th century life in Holland, Vermeer’s principal subjects were usually women engaged in ordinary activities like pouring milk, reading a letter, or sewing. Captured through soft light, generally provided by an open, left window, Vermeer’s hallmarks were simple forms, muted colors, and restrained brushwork. Vermeer’s work is viewed today as one of the high points of the Golden Age of Dutch Painting.
Europe, Visual Arts

Harmony in Red (La chambre rouge; La Desserte - Harmonie rouge), 1908-1909

Arts Days: December 31, 1869: Master of Color
The great French artist Henri Matisse moved fluidly through five decades of art, exploring several different media along the way, from sketching to a form of collage known as “cut outs.” He was one of the key members of the Fauve movement, whose adherents used unusually bold color combinations to create stylized paintings that pushed back against realism.

Yet later in his career, Matisse hewed more toward traditional types of painting, even as his use of color continued to electrify viewers. In his seventies, he also leapt wholeheartedly into collage, using scissors to cut shapes from paper when holding a brush became too difficult for him. Perhaps the greatest French artist of the 20th century, Henri Matisse made art until the very end.
Visual Arts, Europe

The Dance Class painting by Edgar Degas

Arts Days: July 19, 1834: Dancing with Degas
Edgar Degas, one of the most productive 19th century artists and a master at charcoal, oil paint, and pastels, is considered one of the fathers of the Impressionist movement. Thing is, Degas himself disliked this term, preferring to call himself a realist when it came to the subjects he chose and the art he made.

He is best known for his paintings and sculptures of ballerinas, such as The Dance Class. Degas gave us glimpses of dancers waiting in the wings for their cues to go on stage, as well as audiences studying their moves. Mostly, he took his subjects from everyday life, catching a passing moment of motion and emotion.
Europe, Visual Arts

Rembrandt

Arts Days: July 15, 1606: Dutch Master
Dutch painter Rembrandt Van Rijn created beautiful paintings, including many naturalistic self-portraits. Even during his twenties, Rembrandt’s skills as a portrait painter were in great demand for his delicate attention to light and shadows, which he used to shape his subjects’ features.

He gained attention for works like the slightly gruesome The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, in which a doctor uses a corpse to show his students how human arm muscles work. Rembrandt sought to paint the most realistic-looking people and places he possibly could, whether they were richly hued paintings of everyday life in Holland or intricate etches of Biblical images.
Europe, Visual Arts

Vincent Van Gogh

Arts Days: March 30, 1853: A Stroke of Genius
The work of Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh is almost instantly recognizable with those big swirly brush strokes and short choppy ones, day-to-day subjects like haystacks and sunsets, and something harder to put your finger on: a pulsating kind of energy that almost makes the objects and figures seem to vibrate.

Van Gogh’s kinetic, passionate art was driven, sadly, by a lifetime of misfortune. He struggled with poverty, health problems, and depression; in fact, he’s well known for cutting off a piece of his own ear and giving it to a woman he knew, wrapped in newspaper.

One of the few constants in his life was his brother Theo, who helped him manage what money he did earn for his work and tried to support him emotionally as well. In works like Sunflowers and Starry Night, the creativity of the troubled genius Van Gogh touches us even today.
Europe, Visual Arts

The Sistene Chapel

Arts Days: March 06, 1475: Master of Arts
Nothing but making art was important to Michelangelo Buonarroti. As a young apprentice or someone who learns a skill from an expert, Michelangelo found his calling. He chose to study the art of the old masters and learn the technique of painting frescoes, or painting on wet plaster.

When the powerful Medici family of Florence heard the stories about this young genius, Lorenzo de’Medici supported the artist and his work. In the period we now call the Italian Renaissance, (15th–16th centuries), Michelangelo created many of the world’s greatest art masterpieces: sculptures including David and The Pietà, the architectural designs of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, and perhaps his most cherished achievement, the paintings on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

This pictorial story about the creation of man is comprised of nine paintings and took Michelangelo three years to paint. It is believed to be the greatest work of art ever created by a single person.
Europe, Visual Arts

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Arts Days: February 25, 1841: A Lasting Impression
Renoir was an artist fascinated by light: how the sun looked shining on water, how a candle’s flickering changed the expression of someone sitting nearby, how shadows stretched long across the ground in the autumn.

Exploring these concepts, Renoir became one of the early members along with Claude Monet and Alfred Sisley of the Impressionist school, a style of 19th century art known for its exploration of light effects, broad brushstrokes, and ordinary subjects including people on the beach, flower gardens, and other scenes of everyday life.

Later in his career Renoir sought to achieve a more crisp style of painting. It’s thought this change was influenced by a trip he took to Italy in 1881 to study the great works of the Italian Renaissance, painted by artists like Raphael.
Europe, Visual Arts

Raphael

Arts Days: April 06, 1483: Renaissance Man
Raffaello Sanzio is considered one of the finest painters of the Italian Renaissance, which flourished in the 15th and 16th centuries. And so, Raphael needs only one name. His paintings, including The Madonna of the Meadow and The School of Athens (one of the series of paintings in the Vatican’s Stanze di Rafaello, or “Raphael’s rooms”) are filled with trademarks of his signature techniques, from their rich, luminous colors to the graceful placement of his human figures.

Important apprenticeships, combined with his own abundant talent, set the stage for Raphael’s thriving career painting commissioned pieces for churches and royal palaces. There’s also no question he paid attention to what Leonardo da Vinci was doing. But in the end, Raphael’s style—its nod to classic Greek art, the soft light that pervades many of the images—came to be all his own.
Europe, Visual Arts

Vigeland

Arts Days: April 11, 1869: A Park of One’s Own
Sculptor Gustav Vigeland learned to carve wood when he was just a child, a skill that would serve him well as he moved on to working with different substances, like stone. At the end of the 19th century, he toured Italy and France where he visited the workshop of another great sculptor, Auguste Rodin.

Perhaps his greatest work is Vigeland Park, which came about when he persuaded the city of Oslo to give him a building in which to live and work. In exchange, he would give Oslo all of his subsequent creations. Today, on 80 acres of land, you can visit Vigeland Park, where hundreds of granite and bronze artworks stand, from whimsical statues of dancing babies to the Monolith, a 46-foot high totem depicting dozens of intertwined bodies rising up into the sky.
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Michelangelo
"A beautiful thing never gives so much pain as does failing to hear and see it."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Michelangelo
"A great sculpture can roll down a hill without breaking."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Joan Miro
"I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Henri Matisse
"Impressionism is the newspaper of the soul."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Rene-Francois-Ghislain Magritte
"Art evokes the mystery without which the world would not exist."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Henri Matisse
"The portrait is one of the most curious art forms. It demands special qualities in the artist, almost total kinship with the model."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Henri Matisse
"Creativity takes courage."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Henri Matisse
"All my efforts go into creating an art that can be understood by everyone."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Claes Oldenburg
"Art is a technique of communication. The image is the most complete technique of all communication."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Edvard Munch
"I don't believe in an art that is not born out of man's need to open his heart."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Klee
"Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Vasily Kandinsky
"There is no must in art because art is free."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Paul Klee
"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Pablo Picasso
"Painting is just another way of keeping a diary."
Europe, Visual Arts

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Émile Zola
"The artist is nothing without the gift, but the gift is nothing without work."
Europe, Literature

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Dame Rebecca West
"Any authentic work of art must start an argument between the artist and his audience."
Europe, Literature

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | next  ›
show: 25 | 50 | 75 | show all

Filter Your Results

Arts Subject

Select All | Deselect All

Grade Band

Select All | Deselect All

© 1996-2014 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts  

ArtsEdge is an education program of

The Kennedy Center

with the support of

Department of Education



The contents of this Web site were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However, those contents do not
necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal government.

Change Background:

Connect with us!    EMAIL US | YouTube | Facebook | iTunes | MORE!

© 1996-2014 John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts   Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions

Close

You are now leaving the ArtsEdge website. Thank you for visiting!

If you are not automatically transferred, please click the link below:
http://absoluteshakespeare.com

ArtsEdge and The Kennedy Center are in no way responsible for the content of the destination site, its ongoing availability, links to other site or the legality or accuracy of information on the site or its resources.

Cancel

Close