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Dead Man Walking

2700 F St.: Washington National Opera: Dead Man Walking
Dead Man Walking was inspired by the writings of Sister Helen Prejean, an author and activist whose accounts of her interactions with death row inmates provided the basis for an award-winning film in 1995.
Opera, Controversial

Madam Butterfly

2700 F St.: Washington National Opera: Madame Butterfly
Madame Butterfly is a story of East meets West. Many of its characters get into serious and irreversible trouble when they fail (or refuse) to understand the differences between Japanese and American cultures.
Opera, Tragedy, Japan

WNO The Marriage of Figaro - Amanda Majeski as The Countess - photo by Todd Rosenberg

2700 F St.: Washington National Opera's The Marriage of Figaro
This is a story about one happy couple that just wants to get married and one unhappy couple that’s already married… and not doing so well.
Opera, Composers, Music, Music Legends, Europe

Washington National Opera: Daughter of the Regiment

2700 F St.: Washington National Opera: Daughter of the Regiment
Young and beautiful Marie was found as a baby near a French regiment camp. And today she lives her life as the regiment’s resident mascot, singing songs and boosting morale wherever she goes.
Opera, Europe, Comedy

Lost In The Stars

Cuesheet: WNO Open Rehearsal: Lost in the Stars
World War II has ended and South Africa begins to separate white and black communities—with painful and violent results. Are love, faith, and truth enough to bring peace to these divided people? Two fathers search for the answer.
Opera, Backstage, Africa

Carmen; Opera Look-In

Cuesheet: WNO Look-In: Carmen
This narrated program includes fully staged scenes from WNO’s production. The creative team and technicians also take students behind-the-scenes for demonstrations of technical special effects, scene changes, costumes, and more!
Opera, Backstage, Folklore

Hansel & Gretel: WNO Open Rehearsal

Cuesheet: WNO Open Rehearsal: Hansel and Gretel
In this operatic forest, magic and adventure lurk around every corner—and holiday sweets can have a nasty bite. Complete with a cackling witch, enchanted fairies, dancing animals, and an oversized gingerbread oven, this timeless tale comes to life on stage in this whimsical, neon-colored production.
Opera, Backstage, Folklore

Appomattox

Cuesheet: WNO Open Rehearsal: Appomattox
Can prejudice still exisit after 100 years? Find out as two key moments in history collide on the operatic stage.
Opera, Backstage, History, America

WNO Opera Look-in: The Marriage of Figaro

Cuesheet: WNO Look-In: The Marriage of Figaro
Theater, music, and dance come together in this introduction to Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro, one of the world’s most popular operas.
Opera, Backstage, Europe

Washington National Opera: The Flying Dutchman

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: The Flying Dutchman
Wagner’s retelling of a nautical legend is one of opera’s best-loved tales of horror on the high seas. The Flying Dutchman—the cursed captain of a ghostly ship—is condemned to roam the seas forever unless, on the one day he is allowed to come ashore, he can be redeemed through a woman’s unconditional love.
Opera, Backstage

Cinderella: WNO Dress Rehearsal

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: Cinderella
Classic fairytale meets Italian comedy in this reimagined story of the girl who spends her life sweeping cinders, but dreams of something more. If you think you know Cinderella, think again.
Opera, Backstage, Folklore

La Boheme: WNO Opera Look-In

Cuesheet: WNO Opera Look-In: La bohème
Get a special, insider’s peek behind the curtains of one of the world’s most popular operas, Giacomo Puccini’s La bohème.
Opera, Backstage

La Boheme

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: La bohème
Can people survive simply on love and art? Puccini’s famous poor-but-happy Parisians seem to believe so. But can their bohemian lifestyle keep them warm throughout winter into spring?
Opera, Backstage

Washington National Opera: The Little Prince

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: The Little Prince
Take a trip through space and time with a mysterious little prince as he gives a lonely pilot some valuable lessons in life, love, and laughter.
Opera, Backstage

Moby-Dick Opera Look-In

Cuesheet: WNO Look-In: Moby-Dick
Get a special, insider’s peek behind the curtains of Moby-Dick, a new opera of Herman Melville’s 19th-century literary masterwork.
Opera, Backstage, Literature

Washington National Opera: The Elixir of Love

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: Elixir of Love
You can’t make someone love you. Or can you? The hero of this famous comic opera believes he might be able to pull off the impossible with a little magic.
Opera, Backstage

Washington National Opers: Moby Dick

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: Moby-Dick
Hoist sail, raise anchor, and join the hunt for the great white whale! Experience a musical journey of Herman Melville’s epic tale of obsession, madness, and death-defying adventure.
Opera, Backstage, Literature

The Magic Flute: Washington National Opera Working Rehearsal

Cuesheet: WNO Working Rehearsal: The Magic Flute
Anything is possible in a land ruled by light and darkness—even true love. Throw in a zany sidekick, a noble quest, and one enchanted flute, and you have an operatic masterpiece.
Opera, Backstage

American Voices

KC Festival: American Voices
Here’s your opportunity to “go backstage” at the Kennedy Center and see and hear about the unique pleasures and pitfalls of classical, musical theater, jazz, gospel, country, and pop singing.
Backstage, Music, Music Legends, Musicals, Opera, Jazz, Popular Culture, Rock & Roll

Maria Callas as Norma

Article: Viva la Diva!
A look at some of opera's most demanding female roles
Theater, Orchestra, Music, Tragedy, Opera

Atlanta Opera's production of Cosi Fan Tutte

Article: Cozying up to Così
A guide to Mozart's hilarious romantic comedy
Opera, Music, Theater, Comedy, Composers

La Traviata

Article: Boy Meets Girl, Girl Meets Tragic End
You haven't experienced stage romance until you've experienced opera. Here's a look at opera in love
Opera, Tragedy, Europe, Music, Theater

Singer

Article: The Real Life of a Singer
A mini-course in starting a singing career
Music, Young Artists, Musicals, Jobs in the Arts, Opera, Rock & Roll

Singer

Article: What It Takes to Become a Professional Singer
So, you want to be a singer. What's next? A beginner's guide to starting a vocal career
Young Artists, Music, Jobs in the Arts, Opera, Musicals, Broadway

Singing Audition

Article: The Ins and Outs of Trying Out
Pointers for your next singing audition
Musicals, Opera, Music, Young Artists, Jobs in the Arts

Singing at Piano

Article: No Singer is an Island
Some thoughts on being a musical teamplayer
Music, Young Artists, Jobs in the Arts, Musicals, Broadway, Rock & Roll, Opera

henry fonda in the grapes of wrath

Series: The Grapes of Wrath: Voice and Vision
This collection of suggested lessons and activities aim at helping students build a framework, from various perspectives of the 1930s, in which to embed a close study of Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath
America, History, Geography, Science, Nature, Presidents, Literature, Music, Movies & Movie Stars, Opera

Conducting choir

Article: Understanding Different Voice Types
Ever wonder what makes one voice sound different from the next? Check out this look at (and listen to) vocal types and the various colors and textures of the human voice
Young Artists, Music, Opera

Young Female Singer

Article: Advice on Taking Care of Your Voice
Debunk myths about singing and learn the ABC's of how your voice works
Young Artists, Broadway, Jazz, Musicals, Opera, Rock & Roll

Beethoven graffiti

Collection: Great Composers
Get inside the mind of a composer-- from a popular song, to a Broadway musical, to a symphony, how does a composer write music?
Composers, Jazz, Innovators & Pioneers, Musical Instruments, Music, Music Legends, Opera, Orchestra, Popular Culture

It ain’t over ‘til the fat lady sings!

Collection: Opera Resources
Get out your opera glasses and prepare to take a look at the history and evolution of an art form over four hundred years old. Learn how singers train and condition their voices, become familiar with some of the stage’s most tragic love affairs, and discover how theatre and music combined can tell epic stories in unforgettable ways.
Choreographers, Composers, Europe, Musicals, Orchestra, Opera, Tragedy, Theater

Stage Fright

Article: Scare Away Stage Fright
Help your child let go of performance fears
Backstage, Ballet, Broadway, Dance, Family, Musicals, Opera, Orchestra, Young Artists

A Female Singer Performing

Article: Taking Care of Your Vocal Athlete
A resource for parents of young singers with a guide to choosing the right teacher
Musicals, Music, Family, Jazz, Opera, Popular Culture, Rock & Roll

Young Dancers

Article: Child's Play or Real Ambition?
How to connect your child with the performing arts
Young Artists, Family, Ballet, Dance, Musical Instruments, Music, Opera, Theater

Brunhilde

Article: Opera-tunity Knocks
A guide for all opera newbies, both young and old, with some hints as to how to calm the opera skeptic
Opera, Music

Gilded age painting

Grades 9-12 Lesson: Arts of the Gilded Age
Learn about and discuss characteristics of the Gilded Age. Using books, internet and other media, research the various fine and performing art forms popular during that time period.
Opera, Musicals, Architecture, Ballet, Music, Theater

Greece

Audio Series: Music of Greece: Past is Present
Discover how incomplete fragments of papyrus and stone can provide clues to recreating music that has not been heard in thousands of years, explore the far-reaching influence that ancient Greece has had on modern music, and experience the numerous cultural and historical influences that have contributed to the music of today’s Greece.
Opera, Greece, History, Music, World Cultures, Musical Instruments

Marian Anderson singing at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC, 1939

Audio: Marian Anderson: Of Thee We Sing
The road to racial equality was a long one and the battle for equality had many heroes; some of them made history just by opening their mouths to sing.
America, Controversial, History, Music Legends, Opera

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Beverly Sills
"Art is the signature of civilizations."
America, Music, Music Legends, Opera

arts quote

Arts Quotes: Placido Domingo
"The high note is not the only thing."
Music, Music Legends, Opera

Metropolitan Opera House

Arts Days: October 22, 1883: For the Love of Music
Over a century ago, the Metropolitan Opera was housed in a building on Broadway at 39th Street in New York City. It was here that the first performance occurred—namely Faust, by Charles Gounod. The only reason a performance was made possible was all thanks to a group of wealthy New Yorkers with a passion for opera.

After being unable to purchase box seats for performances at the Academy of Music, they banded together to underwrite a brand new opera house. Initially, performers sang in Italian, later in German; fortunately, they agreed to stage operas in the works’ original languages during the 1895–96 season. Imagine hearing Aida in German! Today, the Metropolitan Opera presents over 200 performances each season, culled from a large repertoire, featuring the world’s most renowned vocal talents.
Art Venues, Opera, America

Syndney Opera House

Arts Days: October 20, 1973: Architecture as Art
Think of a few of the world’s most iconic structures. What comes to mind? Probably buildings like the Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, and Big Ben. On this day in 1973, the Sydney Opera House was added to the list. As a symbol of Australia itself, the building resembles a huge white boat at full sail docked at the edge of the bustling Sydney Harbor.

That, in fact, was the image Danish architect Jorn Utzon had in mind when conceiving the design for this building that hosts a wide array of performing arts events, not just opera. Interestingly, the original “sail/roof” was beyond engineering capabilities at the time, and it took Utzon two years to solve design issues affecting the series of shell-shaped pieces.
Opera, Architecture, Art Venues

Luciano Pavarotti

Arts Days: October 12, 1935: King of the High C's
Performing with his father Fernando, a teenage Luciano Pavarotti won an international singing competition in Wales. This accomplishment set the stage for a lifetime of vocal artistry for this world-famous tenor. Pavarotti exposed countless listeners to the wonders of opera and other types of classical vocal music. Incidentally, certain operatic roles—like Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Boheme—became forever linked to the man and his voice.

His gift combined deep expressivity, stellar technique, and the ability to meld opera into pop culture. During a performance of La Fille du Regiment in 1972, Pavarotti received 17 curtain calls, in part for the stunning high Cs he could effortlessly hit. Pavarotti, who set the standard for operatic tenors, was celebrated as a Kennedy Center Honoree in 2001.
Music Legends, Opera, Music

Giuseppe Verdi

Arts Days: October 10, 1813: Viva Verdi
Don't think you know any opera? Bet you do. Several pieces by Giuseppe Verdi have taken such deep root in worldwide arts culture that you've probably heard them—and could even hum them with a little effort. “La donna e mobile,” written by this Italian Romantic composer, is one such recognizable piece from his opera Rigoletto, based on a play by Victor Hugo.

Verdi broke some standard “rules” of opera; for example, his Macbeth was the first Italian opera that did not include a love story, and is considered a truly original piece for that reason. Verdi’s incredible range of operatic works can be heard in La Traviata, Aida, Il Trovatore, and Falstaff. Think opera. Think Verdi.
Composers, Opera, Europe, Music, Music Legends

The John F. Kennedy Center

Arts Days: September 08, 1971: America’s Home for the Arts
In 1958, President Eisenhower signed legislation to build a national cultural center in Washington, D.C. Yet in the wake of President Kennedy’s assassination in 1963, Congress decided that the center would be a “living memorial” to our 35th president, who had worked tirelessly to elevate the role of the arts in America.

Opening night saw the debut performance of Leonard Bernstein’s Mass, written in memory of the fallen president; other performers included the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and the Berkshire Boys Choir. Since that night, the Center has welcomed and entertained millions as the finest performers from around the globe have graced its multiple stages. In addition, its Education Department touches more than 11 million young people, teachers, and parents each year.
Architecture, Art Venues, Backstage, Ballet, Choreographers, Composers, Dance, Dance Legends, America, Innovators & Pioneers, Music, Music Legends, Musicals, Opera, Theater

Giacomo Puccini

Arts Days: December 22, 1858: For the Love of Opera
Are you surprised to learn that Giacomo Puccini was the latest in a long line of musicians in his family? For a while, he served as a church organist and choirmaster, but then he happened to enjoy a night at the opera: Verdi’s opera, Aida. Puccini was so inspired by what he heard and saw that he decided he, too, would compose operas.

He went on to create some of the world’s best-known ones, from La Boheme to Turandot. Over the next decade or so, Puccini composed what were arguably his three most successful operas in a row—Tosca, Madama Butterfly, and La Boheme. Influenced by composers from Verdi to Richard Wagner, Puccini’s operas contain scores of passionate beauty and intensity.
Composers, Opera, Music Legends, Music, Musicals, Europe

Scene from Aida

Arts Days: December 24, 1871: Love on the Nile
One of Giuseppe Verdi’s greatest operas, Aida, made its debut in Cairo, Egypt at the Khedivial Opera House. Why there? Well, an Egyptian prince named Ismail Pasha had commissioned Verdi to write the opera in the first place, paying him 150,000 francs to do so—equivalent to about $32,000 today.

Verdi composed the music for the story of Aida, an Ethiopian princess who is enslaved in Egypt, and her star-crossed relationship with Radames, an Egyptian soldier. Interestingly, Verdi was miffed that no members of the general public were in attendance at this premiere, so he considered the performance in Milan, Italy, the following year to be its true debut.
Musicals, Opera, Africa, Composers, Music, Folklore

Lillian Russell

Arts Days: November 22, 1880: Broadway’s Beauty
In the late 1870s, 18-year-old Helen Louise Leonard arrived in New York City in the hopes of becoming an opera star. After a bit role in a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, the beautiful blonde singer was discovered by theatre owner Tony Pastor. He changed her name and introduced her on opening night as “Lillian Russell, the English Ballad Singer.”

Russell’s gorgeous soprano and voluptuous figure earned her the nickname “America’s Beauty,” and she kept the press busy with her penchant for living life to the fullest. Russell starred in more than 24 musical comedies, many of which were written expressly for her. While none of her musicals are performed today, Lillian Russell is still remembered as one of the early 20th century’s most important Broadway stars.
Broadway, Theater, America, Musicals, Opera, Music Legends, Music

Placido Domingo

Arts Days: January 21, 1941: Phenom of the Opera
At age eight, operatic tenor Plácido Domingo moved to Mexico and attended the National Conservatory of Music in Mexico City. Originally, he studied piano and conducting, until his strong voice was discovered.

Domingo's voice is known for its versatility and dramatic tone throughout its wide range. He made his operatic debut in 1961 as Alfredo in La Traviata. Since then, he has performed for audiences all over the world and has appeared in more than 400 performances in 41 different roles at the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

Domingo has also made a name for himself as a conductor, leading musical forces from London's Covent Garden to New York's Metropolitan Opera and Washington's Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. He is also a 2000 Kennedy Center Honoree.
Music Legends, Opera, Music

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Arts Days: January 27, 1756: The Music Man
It's hard to imagine, but child prodigy Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart could play the keyboard and violin almost as soon as he could walk. He began composing original music at age five and was regularly invited to perform for European royalty.

At 17, he left his home to travel Europe in search of new musical opportunities. He stopped in Vienna, Paris, London, and Rome, where he observed and absorbed new musical forms and techniques.

Mozart's travels helped create his unique, versatile compositional language. He modernized the highly intricate Baroque style of music with advanced technical sophistication, enabling his works to reach new emotional heights.

In his lifetime, he created over 600 works and wrote in every major classical genre: symphony, opera, solo concerto, chamber music including string quartet and quintet, large-scale religious masses, choral music, dances, divertimenti, serenades, and the piano sonata.
Composers, Innovators & Pioneers, Music Legends, Opera, Music, Orchestra

Radio

Arts Days: January 13, 1910: Turn It Up!
Italian engineer Guglielmo Marconi won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his 1896 invention of the radio, which was initially used by ships to communicate with stations on shore. Over a decade later, American inventor and opera lover, Lee de Forest, developed the radio receiver, bringing radio broadcasts to the public.

On this day in 1910, de Forest promoted the radio receiver by broadcasting a live performance of tenor Enrico Caruso from the Metropolitan Opera. At the time, only a small number of people owned radio receivers and could listen to the broadcast, which was sent over a telephone transmitter.
Inventions, Innovators & Pioneers, Math, Opera, Music

Marian Anderson

Arts Days: April 09, 1939: Let Freedom Sing

For more than 40 years, Marian Anderson’s supple contralto voice—lower than an alto or soprano—thrilled audiences the world over. She preferred singing in recitals to opera performance, though many opera companies tried to entice her to sing with them. However, it was the Daughters of the American Revolution’s refusal to let Anderson sing at Constitution Hall simply because of her race that set the stage for perhaps the most important concert of her career.

With an assist from President Franklin Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt, Anderson gave a spellbinding public performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Some 75,000 people listened live in the chilly spring air, and millions more heard Anderson sing on the radio. In 1955, reconsidering her stance on singing in operas, she became the first African American to perform at New York’s Metropolitan Opera. Her grace and beauty—to say nothing of that remarkable voice—made Marian Anderson an important symbol of the Civil Rights Movement.

For more on this historic concert, listen to Of Thee We Sing: Marian Anderson and the Music of the Early Civil Rights Movement.


America, Music, Opera, Controversial

Aida

Cuesheet: WNO Look-In: Aida
Theater, music, and dance come together in this introduction to opera and Verdi’s Aida, one of the world’s most famous operas. At this Look-In, students hear amazing performances; see demonstrations of behind-the scenes technology, lighting, and stagecraft; and get a glimpse into the many careers available in stage performance, both onstage and behind the curtains.
Opera, Backstage

Alcina

2700 F St.: Alcina: Washington National Opera Open Rehearsal
Welcome to the island of illusions, where Alcina, a beautiful sorceress, turns her lovers into wild beasts or stone when she tires of them. When the dashing knight Ruggiero is in her clutches, his fiancée Bradamante takes on a daring disguise to free her beloved and break the curse. But is Alcina finally falling for the man of her dreams? In this cruel paradise, can anyone tell what is real?
Opera, Backstage

The Little Prince

2700 F St.: The Little Prince: Washington National Opera Open Rehearsal
A young boy sets out on a quest across the cosmos to find new companionship after leaving his tiny home planet, where he spent his days protecting his only friend, a rose, from miniature volcanoes and ravenous baobab trees. Along the way, he meets fascinating intergalactic inhabitants, including a delusional king, a rich businessman, and a wearied lamplighter. Eventually, he meets a pilot on Earth who has crash-landed in the Sahara. The two become unlikely friends, learning lessons from the desert’s many creatures until the prince realizes just how special his rose really is.
Opera, Backstage, Young Artists, Literature

The Little Prince

Cuesheet: The Little Prince
A young boy sets out on a quest across the cosmos to find new companionship after leaving his tiny home planet, where he spent his days protecting his only friend, a rose, from miniature volcanoes and ravenous baobab trees. Along the way, he meets fascinating intergalactic inhabitants, including a delusional king, a rich businessman, and a wearied lamplighter. Eventually, he meets a pilot on Earth who has crash-landed in the Sahara. The two become unlikely friends, learning lessons from the desert’s many creatures until the prince realizes just how special his rose really is.
Opera, Literature

La Traviata

Cuesheet: Opera Look-In: La traviata
At this Look-In, students hear amazing performances; see demonstrations of behind-the-scenes technology, lighting, and stagecraft; and get a glimpse into the many careers available in stage performance, both onstage and behind the curtains.
Opera, Tragedy, Europe, Backstage

Eugine Onegin

2700 F St.: Eugene Onegin
Based on Alexander Pushkin’s sweeping novel, Eugene Onegin is a provocative tale of rejection and regret, exploring a society divided between rural austerity and aristocratic extravagance. Young Tatiana confesses her devotion to the worldly Onegin, but his cold refusal devastates her. Years later, when Tatiana matures, it is Onegin who begs for her love. Will Tatiana embrace the man she once longed for? Or will Onegin forever be the victim of his own bitter decision? This production, originally created for The Metropolitan Opera, is complete with lush period costumes, majestic ballroom scenes, and a deadly duel.
Europe, Opera

Silent Night

2700 F St.: Silent Night
Based on the true story of a wartime ceasefire, Silent Night makes its WNO premiere in the centennial month of World War I’s end. The year is 1914 and the Great War has just been declared, dividing nations and sending millions into battle. As Christmas Eve falls on a battlefield near Belgium, soldiers in French, German, and Scottish trenches begin recalling songs of home, stepping into no-man’s-land for a spontaneous truce. Once sworn enemies, they trade their weapons for merriment and camaraderie—resulting in one miraculous night of peace.
The Human Journey, Europe, Opera, History

La Traviata

2700 F St.: La Traviata: WNO Open Rehearsal
Including everything from the famous brindisi drinking song to heartbreaking arias, La traviata is one of the most beloved operas ever written. Violetta, a courtesan, is the life of every party. But she holds a devastating secret: she is sick and dying. When she meets the affluent Alfredo, happily-ever-after seems within reach— until his father condemns Violetta’s low social status. Now she must make an impossible choice before death claims her. This everlasting story of love and sacrifice captures Violetta’s unforgettable plight and illuminates tensions of social class that ring just as true today.
Europe, Opera

The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me

Cuesheet: WNO Open Rehearsal: The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me
Based on the award-winning children’s book by Jeanette Winterson, this heartwarming production returns with whimsical costumes, music from a Tony®-award winning composer, and a talented cast featuring the Domingo- Cafritz Young Artists and the WNO Children’s Chorus.
Animals, Literature, Opera

Faust

2700 F St.: Faust
The famous story by Goethe focuses on the aging Faust, who makes a pact with Mephistopheles. Exchanging his soul restores his youth and helps him woo Marguerite, but his troubles are far from over. Along the seductive path to riches and power, Faust realizes his salvation is tragically bound to others, including those he loves most. WNO’s production of this tale of redemption and damnation features a storybook aesthetic and a phenomenal cast.
Europe, Opera

The Me I Want To Sing

2700 F St.: The Me I Want To Sing
Returning since its powerful 2017 premiere on the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage, this riveting two-performer show blends opera legends Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price’s most memorable performances—including opera, art songs, and more—with narrative spoken word. Created and written by Tom Minter and originally commissioned by Washington National Opera Artistic Director Francesca Zambello, the work chronicles some of the challenges these two women faced in their careers as African American singers, and highlights ongoing issues of race in America.
Opera

Tosca

2700 F St.: Tosca
In love and war, what will you stand for? Puccini’s breathtaking work is a tale of political corruption and ill-fated love that amazes and captivates new and longtime opera lovers alike. In 18th-century Rome, the zealous painter Cavaradossi and singer Tosca are deeply in love. When Cavaradossi hides an escaped political prisoner, a tragic conflict unfurls. Caught between contending with the villainous chief of police and staying loyal to her lover, Tosca make take matters into her own hands—but no one is guaranteed to get out alive.
Europe, Opera

Abraham Lincoln

Audio Series: Abraham Lincoln and Music
Abraham Lincoln was one of America's most unmusical presidents - he could neither play an instrument nor carry a tune
History, Music, Presidents, Theater, America, Opera, Musicals

Performance Guide: The Magic Flute
Friends will become foes and enemies will become allies in Mozart's final and beloved opera, a whimsical production designed by children's author/illustrator Maurice Sendak. This quest for love and truth is rich with unforgettable vocal acrobatics, evocative symbols and allegory, and colorful characters such as a handsome young prince, a silly bird-catching sidekick, and a mysterious Queen of the Night.
Backstage, Opera

Performance Guide: The Magic Flute: Opera Look-In
Theater and music come together in this introduction to opera and "The Magic Flute," one of the world's most beloved operas. A whimsical production designed by children's author/illustrator Maurice Sendak sets a playful landscape for this enchanting fairy tale. Join handsome prince Tamino and his silly sidekick Papageno as they set out on a fantastic journey to rescue the kidnapped Pamina in this special opera exploration. At this Look-In, students hear amazing performances; see demonstrations of behind-the-scenes technology, lighting, and stagecraft; and get a glimpse into the many careers available in stage performance, both onstage and behind the curtains.
Opera

Performance Guide: Otello
As a raging storm breaks on Cyprus, the governor Otello returns victorious from battle. But there is another storm brewing. Iago, Otello’s ensign, launches a malicious scheme to lead his chief to believe his wife Desdemona is unfaithful. As Iago’s manipulations decay Otello’s trust in those he loves, the great hero will confront his most fatal enemy: his own jealousy. Verdi’s monumental retelling of Shakespeare’s masterpiece offers a psychological medium to explore good and evil, as well as the downfall of a celebrated leader.
Backstage, Opera

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